History of Cricket

Kavya E
Published on: 22nd January 2014
Cricket was born in England 500 years ago. Until middle 18th century, bats almost resembled hockey bats. Bat means stick or club. Originally cricket was not time limited. The game would go on as long as it took to bowl out a side twice. This was before the Industrial Revolution, when life was slower.

Peculiarities of test cricket are that, the match would continue upto five days and might end up in a draw. No other sport take even half the time as much as test cricket took to complete. First written 'Laws of cricket' were drawn up in 1744. It stated "The principals shall choose from amongst the gentlemen present two umpires who shall absolutely decide all disputes. The stumps must be 22 inches high and the bails across them six inches. The ball must be between five and six ounces, and the two sets of stumps 22 yards apart". Size and shape of ground is not specified.
history cricket,england
The world's first cricket club was formed in Hambeldon in 1760's. During 1760's and 1770's it became common practice to pitch the ball through air rather than rolling it along the ground. Hence, bowlers had an option of length, deception through air, change of pace, new possibilities of spin and swing. Now batsmen had to use their tactics for shot selection and timing. As a result the curved bats were replaced by the straight one.

Important tools of cricket are made of natural, pre-industrial materials. Bat made of wood, earlier single piece of wood, now it consists of two pieces- the blade and handle. Even today bat and ball are handmade.
The affordable rich were amateurs and unaffordable poor were professionals. Amateurs were called Gentlemen and professionals as players. Ameturs would bat and professionals had the hardworking part that is, bowl. Cricket was a batsman's game. Most of rules were in favor of batsmen, but now times have changed. And sometimes, just sometimes, history shows hows the dots connect backwards, be it in cricket or life.
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