The story behind the success of Nepal's youngest director

Aditya Khadka
Published on: 4th Anniversary (20 Nov '15)
Aditya Khadka
I am Aditya Khadka. I’m a student a 14 years old ninth grader at Vidhya Sanskar School, Nepal. I’m a little different than my friends. Not in a sense that I have three legs or four eyes. But what makes me different is my thought that makes me think I’m different; I’m special. Not for one of my kindergarten teacher who told that I wouldn’t even pass the kindergarten. That doesn’t make me special and so I used to be awarded with beatings. This thinking of mine troubled me a lot as well. I used to be liked my friends in school when I was a kid. But the senior boys bullied me a lot when I was in elementary school. I spent my childhood crying and then wiping my tears away and fighting back, because I was special. And each time I cried I fought back stronger. This is how I rocked my childhood.

Ever since a child, I dreamed to become a filmmaker. Most kids play with toys and dolls in childhood. But since I was special, I used to play with cameras. Something was there between me and the cameras, something so strong that always gives me joy when there’s a camera around, something I didn’t understand or know what it was.
Aditya Khadka
I grew up with camera and the main reason behind it was my parents who are filmmakers by profession. I used to see the video editor editing and I slowly learned editing. I knew how to use a camera and how to edit professionally. So, I thought why not give away a try? Why not make a film of yourself on your own? But it was my first time making a film. It sure was hard. I tried and failed and tried again.

At the age of 12, I made my first 20 minutes documentary video. Whoever watched it would say only one word – wow! My childhood dream to become a filmmaker one day eventually came true. I received a nice media coverage and gained very much confidence; enough to help me make more short films. Today, I am one of the nominees for the “Glocal Teen Hero – 2015”; I am one of the six extraordinary and fantastic teenagers of Nepal and, the youngest documentary maker of Nepal. Back then in childhood, I thought I was special. Today, I don’t think that I’m special anymore, because I know I’m special. I don’t only say that, every people I meet say that. This is the law of attraction; turning your thoughts into reality. If you desperately want something, think about it all day and work restlessly till your muscles ache and still continue persuading that something you desire or dream for, your thought to achieve that something will come true anyhow. You just need to do what you love and love what you do.
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